Partyflock

Ons onderwijs systeem

 
Flockonderwerp · 30333
Fascinerend artikel onderaan over het onderwijs in Amerika. Idem dito in Europees onderwijs systeem.

Zeg maar een soort: "mensen een hoop troep in je hoofd" vetmest-bedrijf met als belangrijkste functie:
het kaf van het koren te scheiden.

het kaf:"een leuk slaafje wat alles aanneemt omdat ze zo full of crap zitten"

het koren: "De rebel of de zwakkere student: Geen papiertje, geen geld, minder kans op een goed leven, gezondheid en jawel, voortplanting (niemand valt op een stakker zonder geld)"

Puur Darwinisme!

Geen wonder dat ik me altijd een ongeluk verveelde op school. :Z
Buiten een stuk of 5 vakken. Vond ik de +/-8 andere vakken echt Kilo Utrecht Tango met peren.

Ik bedoel wat heb je nou aan zinsontleding?
Ik ergerde me een "lijdend voorwerp" aan dat vak! idd met lange ij!
Gebruikt iemand dat later ooit op zijn werk?
Misschien sommige beroepen zoals tolk of leraar, oke.

Of maatschappijleer? waar de integratie hysteria er al vroeg werd ingepeperd.
Ieder mens heeft in principe al normen en waarden volgens de wetten van infinite love.
Maar hier regeren de wetten van verkankering.

Hoe dan ook uit mijn traject begeleiding voor werkzoekenden is gebleken om opvoeder te worden, dus terug naar school voor deze jongen.

Het idee staat me echt aan! Infiltreren als strenge opvoeder op internaat en ondertussen de visie op het wereld van deze jongeren infecteren. :lol: ik bedoel, evil laugh! MWAHAHAHA!!! :[


John Taylor Gatto is a former New York State and New York City Teacher of the
Year and the author, most recently, of The Underground History of American
Education.­ He was a participant in the Harper's Magazine forum "­School on a Hill,"­
which appeared in the September 2003 issue.­


I taught for thirty years in some of the worst schools in Manhattan, and in some of the best, and during that time I became an expert in boredom.­ Boredom was everywhere in my world, and if you asked the kids, as I often did, why they felt so bored, they always gave the same answers: They said the work was stupid, that it made no sense, that they already knew it.­ They said they wanted to be doing something real, not just sitting around.­ They said teachers didn't seem to know much about their subjects and clearly weren't interested in learning more.­ And the kids were right: their teachers were every bit as bored as they were.­

Boredom is the common condition of schoolteachers, and anyone who has spent time in a teachers' lounge can vouch for the low energy, the whining, the dispirited attitudes, to be found there.­ When asked why they feel bored, the teachers tend to blame the kids, as you might expect.­ Who wouldn't get bored teaching students who are rude and interested only in grades? If even that.­ Of course, teachers are themselves products of the same twelve-year compulsory school programs that so thoroughly bore their students, and as school personnel they are trapped inside structures even more rigid than those imposed upon the children.­ Who, then, is to blame?

We all are.­ My grandfather taught me that.­ One afternoon when I was seven I complained to him of boredom, and he batted me hard on the head.­ He told me that I was never to use that term in his presence again, that if I was bored it was my fault and no one else's.­ The obligation to amuse and instruct myself was entirely my own, and people who didn't know that were childish people, to be avoided if possible.­ Certainty not to be trusted.­ That episode cured me of boredom forever, and here and there over the years I was able to pass on the lesson to some remarkable student.­ For the most part, however, I found it futile to challenge the official notion that boredom and childishness were the natural state of affairs in the classroom.­ Often I had to defy custom, and even bend the law, to help kids break out of this trap.­

The empire struck back, of course;­ childish adults regularly conflate opposition with disloyalty.­ I once returned from a medical leave to discover t~at all evidence of my having been granted the leave had been purposely destroyed, that my job had been terminated, and that I no longer possessed even a teaching license.­ After nine months of tormented effort I was able to retrieve the license when a school secretary testified to witnessing the plot unfold.­ In the meantime my family suffered more than I care to remember.­ By the time I finally retired in 1991, 1 had more than enough reason to think of our schools-with their long-term, cell-block-style, forced confinement of both students and teachers-as virtual factories of childishness.­ Yet I honestly could not see why they had to be that way.­ My own experience had revealed to me what many other teachers must learn along the way, too, yet keep to themselves for fear of reprisal: if we wanted to we could easily and inexpensively jettison the old, stupid structures and help kids take an education rather than merely receive a schooling.­ We could encourage the best qualities of youthfulness-curiosity, adventure, resilience, the capacity for surprising insightsimply by being more flexible about time, texts, and tests, by introducing kids to truly competent adults, and by giving each student what autonomy he or she needs in order to take a risk every now and then.­

But we don't do that.­ And the more I asked why not, and persisted in thinking about the "­problem"­ of schooling as an engineer might, the more I missed the point: What if there is no "­problem"­ with our schools? What if they are the way they are, so expensively flying in the face of common sense and long experience in how children learn things, not because they are doing something wrong but because they are doing something right? Is it possible that George W.­ Bush accidentally spoke the truth when he said we would "­leave no child behind"­? Could it be that our schools are designed to make sure not one of them ever really grows up?

Do we really need school? I don't mean education, just forced schooling: six classes a day, five days a week, nine months a year, for twelve years.­ Is this deadly routine really necessary? And if so, for what? Don't hide behind reading, writing, and arithmetic as a rationale, because 2 million happy homeschoolers have surely put that banal justification to rest.­ Even if they hadn't, a considerable number of well-known Americans never went through the twelve-year wringer our kids currently go through, and they turned out all right.­ George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln? Someone taught them, to be sure, but they were not products of a school system, and not one of them was ever "­graduated"­ from a secondary school.­ Throughout most of American history, kids generally didn't go to high school, yet the unschooled rose to be admirals, like Farragut;­ inventors, like Edison;­ captains of industry like Carnegie and Rockefeller;­ writers, like Melville and Twain and Conrad;­ and even scholars, like Margaret Mead.­ In fact, until pretty recently people who reached the age of thirteen weren't looked upon as children at all.­ Ariel Durant, who co-wrote an enormous, and very good, multivolume history of the world with her husband, Will, was happily married at fifteen, and who could reasonably claim that Ariel Durant was an uneducated person? Unschooled, perhaps, but not uneducated.­

We have been taught (that is, schooled) in this country to think of "­success"­ as synonymous with, or at least dependent upon, "­schooling,"­ but historically that isn't true in either an intellectual or a financial sense.­ And plenty of people throughout the world today find a way to educate themselves without resorting to a system of compulsory secondary schools that all too often resemble prisons.­ Why, then, do Americans confuse education with just such a system? What exactly is the purpose of our public schools?

Mass schooling of a compulsory nature really got its teeth into the United States between 1905 and 1915, though it was conceived of much earlier and pushed for throughout most of the nineteenth century.­ The reason given for this enormous upheaval of family life and cultural traditions was, roughly speaking, threefold:

1) To make good people.­ 2) To make good citizens.­ 3) To make each person his or her personal best.­ These goals are still trotted out today on a regular basis, and most of us accept them in one form or another as a decent definition of public education's mission, however short schools actually fall in achieving them.­ But we are dead wrong.­ Compounding our error is the fact that the national literature holds numerous and surprisingly consistent statements of compulsory schooling's true purpose.­ We have, for example, the great H.­ L.­ Mencken, who wrote in The American Mercury for April 1924 that the aim of public education is not

to fill the young of the species with knowledge and awaken their intelligence.­ ...­ Nothing could be further from the truth.­ The aim ...­ is simply to reduce as many individuals as possible to the same safe level, to breed and train a standardized citizenry, to put down dissent and originality.­ That is its aim in the United States...­ and that is its aim everywhere else.­

Because of Mencken's reputation as a satirist, we might be tempted to dismiss this passage as a bit of hyperbolic sarcasm.­ His article, however, goes on to trace the template for our own educational system back to the now vanished, though never to be forgotten, military state of Prussia.­ And although he was certainly aware of the irony that we had recently been at war with Germany, the heir to Prussian thought and culture, Mencken was being perfectly serious here.­ Our educational system really is Prussian in origin, and that really is cause for concern.­

The odd fact of a Prussian provenance for our schools pops up again and again once you know to look for it.­ William James alluded to it many times at the turn of the century.­ Orestes Brownson, the hero of Christopher Lasch's 1991 book, The True and Only Heaven, was publicly denouncing the Prussianization of American schools back in the 1840s.­ Horace Mann's "­Seventh Annual Report"­ to the Massachusetts State Board of Education in 1843 is essentially a paean to the land of Frederick the Great and a call for its schooling to be brought here.­ That Prussian culture loomed large in America is hardly surprising, given our early association with that utopian state.­ A Prussian served as Washington's aide during the Revolutionary War, and so many German-speaking people had settled here by 1795 that Congress considered publishing a German-language edition of the federal laws.­ But what shocks is that we should so eagerly have adopted one of the very worst aspects of Prussian culture: an educational system deliberately designed to produce mediocre intellects, to hamstring the inner life, to deny students appreciable leadership skills, and to ensure docile and incomplete citizens 11 in order to render the populace "­manageable."­

It was from James Bryant Conant-president of Harvard for twenty years, WWI poison-gas specialist, WWII executive on the atomic-bomb project, high commissioner of the American zone in Germany after WWII, and truly one of the most influential figures of the twentieth century-that I first got wind of the real purposes of American schooling.­ Without Conant, we would probably not have the same style and degree of standardized testing that we enjoy today, nor would we be blessed with gargantuan high schools that warehouse 2,000 to 4,000 students at a time, like the famous Columbine High in Littleton, Colorado.­ Shortly after I retired from teaching I picked up Conant's 1959 book-length essay, The Child the Parent and the State, and was more than a little intrigued to see him mention in passing that the modem schools we attend were the result of a "­revolution"­ engineered between 1905 and 1930.­ A revolution? He declines to elaborate, but he does direct the curious and the uninformed to Alexander Inglis's 1918 book, Principles of Secondary Education, in which "­one saw this revolution through the eyes of a revolutionary."­

Inglis, for whom a lecture in education at Harvard is named, makes it perfectly clear that compulsory schooling on this continent was intended to be just what it had been for Prussia in the 1820s: a fifth column into the burgeoning democratic movement that threatened to give the peasants and the proletarians a voice at the bargaining table.­ Modern, industrialized, compulsory schooling was to make a sort of surgical incision into the prospective unity of these underclasses.­ Divide children by subject, by age-grading, by constant rankings on tests, and by many other more subtle means, and it was unlikely that the ignorant mass of mankind, separated in childhood, would ever re-integrate into a dangerous whole.­

Inglis breaks down the purpose - the actual purpose - of modem schooling into six basic functions, any one of which is enough to curl the hair of those innocent enough to believe the three traditional goals listed earlier:

1) The adjustive or adaptive function.­ Schools are to establish fixed habits of reaction to authority.­ This, of course, precludes critical judgment completely.­ It also pretty much destroys the idea that useful or interesting material should be taught, because you can't test for reflexive obedience until you know whether you can make kids learn, and do, foolish and boring things.­

2) The integrating function.­ This might well be called "­the conformity function,"­ because its intention is to make children as alike as possible.­ People who conform are predictable, and this is of great use to those who wish to harness and manipulate a large labor force.­

3) The diagnostic and directive function.­ School is meant to determine each student's proper social role.­ This is done by logging evidence mathematically and anecdotally on cumulative records.­ As in "­your permanent record."­ Yes, you do have one.­

4) The differentiating function.­ Once their social role has been "­diagnosed,"­ children are to be sorted by role and trained only so far as their destination in the social machine merits - and not one step further.­ So much for making kids their personal best.­

5) The selective function.­ This refers not to human choice at all but to Darwin's theory of natural selection as applied to what he called "­the favored races."­ In short, the idea is to help things along by consciously attempting to improve the breeding stock.­ Schools are meant to tag the unfit - with poor grades, remedial placement, and other punishments - clearly enough that their peers will accept them as inferior and effectively bar them from the reproductive sweepstakes.­ That's what all those little humiliations from first grade onward were intended to do: wash the dirt down the drain.­

6) The propaedeutic function.­ The societal system implied by these rules will require an elite group of caretakers.­ To that end, a small fraction of the kids will quietly be taught how to manage this continuing project, how to watch over and control a population deliberately dumbed down and declawed in order that government might proceed unchallenged and corporations might never want for obedient labor.­

That, unfortunately, is the purpose of mandatory public education in this country.­ And lest you take Inglis for an isolated crank with a rather too cynical take on the educational enterprise, you should know that he was hardly alone in championing these ideas.­ Conant himself, building on the ideas of Horace Mann and others, campaigned tirelessly for an American school system designed along the same lines.­ Men like George Peabody, who funded the cause of mandatory schooling throughout the South, surely understood that the Prussian system was useful in creating not only a harmless electorate and a servile labor force but also a virtual herd of mindless consumers.­ In time a great number of industrial titans came to recognize the enormous profits to be had by cultivating and tending just such a herd via public education, among them Andrew Carnegie and John D.­ Rockefeller.­

Tre you have it.­ Now you know.­ We don't need Karl Marx's conception of a grand warfare between the classes to see that it is in the interest of complex management, economic or political, to dumb people down, to demoralize them, to divide them from one another, and to discard them if they don't conform.­ Class may frame the proposition, as when Woodrow Wilson, then president of Princeton University, said the following to the New York City School Teachers Association in 1909: "­We want one class of persons to have a liberal education, and we want another class of persons, a very much larger class, of necessity, in every society, to forgo the privileges of a liberal education and fit themselves to perform specific difficult manual tasks."­ But the motives behind the disgusting decisions that bring about these ends need not be class-based at all.­ They can stem purely from fear, or from the by now familiar belief that "­efficiency"­ is the paramount virtue, rather than love, lib, erty, laughter, or hope.­ Above all, they can stem from simple greed.­

There were vast fortunes to be made, after all, in an economy based on mass production and organized to favor the large corporation rather than the small business or the family farm.­ But mass production required mass consumption, and at the turn of the twentieth century most Americans considered it both unnatural and unwise to buy things they didn't actually need.­ Mandatory schooling was a godsend on that count.­ School didn't have to train kids in any direct sense to think they should consume nonstop, because it did something even better: it encouraged them not to think at all.­ And that left them sitting ducks for another great invention of the modem era - marketing.­

Now, you needn't have studied marketing to know that there are two groups of people who can always be convinced to consume more than they need to: addicts and children.­ School has done a pretty good job of turning our children into addicts, but it has done a spectacular job of turning our children into children.­ Again, this is no accident.­ Theorists from Plato to Rousseau to our own Dr.­ Inglis knew that if children could be cloistered with other children, stripped of responsibility and independence, encouraged to develop only the trivializing emotions of greed, envy, jealousy, and fear, they would grow older but never truly grow up.­ In the 1934 edition of his once well-known book Public Education in the United States, Ellwood P.­ Cubberley detailed and praised the way the strategy of successive school enlargements had extended childhood by two to six years, and forced schooling was at that point still quite new.­ This same Cubberley - who was dean of Stanford's School of Education, a textbook editor at Houghton Mifflin, and Conant's friend and correspondent at Harvard - had written the following in the 1922 edition of his book Public School Administration: "­Our schools are ...­ factories in which the raw products (children) are to be shaped and fashioned ....­ And it is the business of the school to build its pupils according to the specifications laid down."­

It's perfectly obvious from our society today what those specifications were.­ Maturity has by now been banished from nearly every aspect of our lives.­ Easy divorce laws have removed the need to work at relationships;­ easy credit has removed the need for fiscal self-control;­ easy entertainment has removed the need to learn to entertain oneself;­ easy answers have removed the need to ask questions.­ We have become a nation of children, happy to surrender our judgments and our wills to political exhortations and commercial blandishments that would insult actual adults.­ We buy televisions, and then we buy the things we see on the television.­ We buy computers, and then we buy the things we see on the computer.­ We buy $­150 sneakers whether we need them or not, and when they fall apart too soon we buy another pair.­ We drive SUVs and believe the lie that they constitute a kind of life insurance, even when we're upside-down in them.­ And, worst of all, we don't bat an eye when Ari Fleischer tells us to "­be careful what you say,"­ even if we remember having been told somewhere back in school that America is the land of the free.­ We simply buy that one too.­ Our schooling, as intended, has seen to it.­

Now for the good news.­ Once you understand the logic behind modern schooling, its tricks and traps are fairly easy to avoid.­ School trains children to be employees and consumers;­ teach your own to be leaders and adventurers.­ School trains children to obey reflexively;­ teach your own to think critically and independently.­ Well-schooled kids have a low threshold for boredom;­ help your own to develop an inner life so that they'll never be bored.­ Urge them to take on the serious material, the grown-up material, in history, literature, philosophy, music, art, economics, theology - all the stuff schoolteachers know well enough to avoid.­ Challenge your kids with plenty of solitude so that they can learn to enjoy their own company, to conduct inner dialogues.­ Well-schooled people are conditioned to dread being alone, and they seek constant companionship through the TV, the computer, the cell phone, and through shallow friendships quickly acquired and quickly abandoned.­ Your children should have a more meaningful life, and they can.­

First, though, we must wake up to what our schools really are: laboratories of experimentation on young minds, drill centers for the habits and attitudes that corporate society demands.­ Mandatory education serves children only incidentally;­ its real purpose is to turn them into servants.­ Don't let your own have their childhoods extended, not even for a day.­ If David Farragut could take command of a captured British warship as a pre-teen, if Thomas Edison could publish a broadsheet at the age of twelve, if Ben Franklin could apprentice himself to a printer at the same age (then put himself through a course of study that would choke a Yale senior today), there's no telling what your own kids could do.­ After a long life, and thirty years in the public school trenches, I've concluded that genius is as common as dirt.­ We suppress our genius only because we haven't yet figured out how to manage a population of educated men and women.­ The solution, I think, is simple and glorious.­ Let them manage themselves.­
laatste aanpassing
Blijven leren, kids!

Ome influence wil dat jullie zelf gaan denken. :)

bestudeer dit om te beginnen...

The wonderful world of quantumfysics explaining infinite universes, icecristals, god, emotions, the brain,...
Even why we are all addicted in a sertain way and it's holding us back.
The great secret: that you can do anything in life.
SSSSST! Laat de regering het horen! :X



Whoei! Wat een hersenkrakende docu! Zelfstudie (y)

Ik weet niet of het allemaal klopt, maar het zet me toch weer aan het denken.
Het enigste wat ik niet begreep was die indiaan die de schepen niet zag. Lijkt me sterk!
Misschien hebben we daarom ook moeite om ufo's te spotten.

Tot quantumfysicus zal ik het nooit schoppen. Mij te ingewikkeld, zeker op wiskundig vlak.
Da's iets voor een volgend leven.

Het zou ook niet leuk zijn om alles te weten.
Als ik alles wist was ik hier ook niet om mijn karma uit te leven.
Zolang ik al leer (wat ik wil tenminste) voelt het oke.
laatste aanpassing
Ons onderwijssysteem is één en al onzin natuurlijk. De helft van de shit is gewoon gebaseerd op theorietjes wat aan alle kanten wankelt. Denk hierbij aan vakken zoals Geschiedenis, Maatschappijleer en Filosofie. Het is toch eindelijk grappig dat als een kringloop iedereen de grootste onzin wordt voorgekauwd om zo het slaafje te blijven binnen de maatschappij.

Uitspraak van Infected Influence op donderdag 21 december 2006 om 07:11:
Het zou ook niet leuk zijn om alles te weten.­
Als ik alles wist was ik hier ook niet om mijn karma uit te leven.­
Zolang ik al leer (wat ik wil tenminste) voelt het oke.­

Als je werkelijk de eenheid van dit multiversum volledig hebt doorgrond dan zijn we idd hier niet meer, logischerwijs heb je dan de perfectie bereikt van God en wordt je toegevoegd tot het 'licht', lijkt mij dan..Natuurlijk blijft het dé grote vraag wat 'buiten' dit multiversum is.
Uitspraak van l e x i e op donderdag 21 december 2006 om 14:07:
Natuurlijk blijft het dé grote vraag wat 'buiten' dit multiversum is.­

Ik denk totale eenheid.

Grappig zo was ik weer eens aan het brainstormen en besefte: hey, het woord "heelal" is eigenlijk het "al". Heel-al

Geen idee waar de "heel" voor staat, misschien "helemaal al" ofzo :lol:
laatste aanpassing
Uitspraak van l e x i e op donderdag 21 december 2006 om 14:07:
Het is toch eindelijk grappig dat als een kringloop iedereen de grootste onzin wordt voorgekauwd om zo het slaafje te blijven binnen de maatschappij.­

Zielig eerder want ze zijn er nog trots op ook.
Kijk eens hoeveel onzin ik weet het staat zwart/wit op mijn papiertje. :lol:

Damn! Ik hield eigenlijk van vakken zoals geschiedenis nog steeds trouwens.
Ik weet eigenlijk niet meer of ik gemotiveerd was voor het vak of meer voor de juf. O:)

School is niet allemaal onzin natuurlijk. laten we zeggen 45/55.
45% onzin, en 55% iets waar je later wat aan hebt. gokje!

Probleem was (toch hier in Belgie) dat je voor alle vakken erdoor moet zijn. 1 vak onvoldoende jaar overdoen/herexamen. Ookal was het zoiets idioots als blokfluit les. Zeker in de latijnse richtingen
(hartstikke streng, want daar zit de créme de la créme)

Technisch viel gelukkig nog mee kwa strengheid.
Het bevestigt toch weer die afvalrace, want dat is het in feite.
laatste aanpassing
Uitspraak van Infected Influence op donderdag 21 december 2006 om 18:16:
Ik denk totale eenheid.­

Grappig zo was ik weer eens aan het brainstormen en besefte: hey, het woord "­heelal"­ is eigenlijk het "­al".­ Heel-al

Geen idee waar de "­heel"­ voor staat, misschien "­helemaal al"­ ofzo

Yes dat is ook wat ik bedoelde. Het gehele multiversum (matrix zoals Icke het noemt) is natuurlijk de eenheid. Maar wat precies daarbuiten is weet je niet. Misschien helemaal niks, misschien weer andere eenheden die het geheel weer een andere eenheid maakt.

Heel = Al dus eigenlijk zijn het 2 dezelfde termen die aan elkaar geplakt zijn :P

Uitspraak van Infected Influence op donderdag 21 december 2006 om 18:34:
School is niet allemaal onzin natuurlijk.­ laten we zeggen 45/55.­
45% onzin, en 55% iets waar je later wat aan hebt.­ gokje!

Het is maar net hoe je het ziet natuurlijk, taal en wiskunde zijn natuurlijk goed voor je brein. Maar de rest is gewoon allemaal dikke onzin, de werkelijke essentie van alles wordt gewoon niet verteld, het is alleen maar kennis. Geef mij maar wijsheid 8)
Chicks diggen dat wel zo'n baard, denk ik.

Wijsheid (y)
Ik had het hier laatst over met een vriend van me.­ Neem nou talen leren.­ Handig, ik bedoel zonder Italiaans zou ik het hier niet redden.­ Maar als ik me mijn lessen Frans, Duits, NL enz.­ herinner is me nóóit uitgelegd WAAROM we wat we leerden leerden.­
Het idee van onderwijs lijkt mij ontwikkeling en verrijking en niet in een ongeïnspireerde omgeving door hogerhand bepaalde leerstof stampen.­
Uitspraak van mieXQe op donderdag 28 december 2006 om 14:52:
Het idee van onderwijs lijkt mij ontwikkeling en verrijking en niet in een ongeïnspireerde omgeving door hogerhand bepaalde leerstof stampen.­

Een mens leert het beste van zich zelf en bep. situaties. Iemand vertelde me eens: "als je een taal wilt leren, ga naar het land in kwestie.". Ik heb voornamelijk Engels geleerd door dat ik veel familie in Noorwegen en Engeland heb wonen(TV niet te vergeten). Was een kwestie van aanpassing.

Ik had verschillende leraren Frans: De ene ratelde gewoon het boekje af, toen was ik al snel verveeld. De andere sprak in het Frans over feestjes, skateboarden, ... interessante onderwerpen en toen had ik zoiets:" Jeetje snel Frans leren, ik wil weten wat die kerel zegt!" :)

Tis gewoon de manier hoe je als leraar overkomt, maar dat mag niet meer het moet allemaal volgens het boekje tegenwoordig. Gelukkig zijn er nog die de regels een beetje buigen, anders komt heel de klas in opstand. Ahh memories!

Zo heb ik eens tegen zo'n leraar gezegt toen hij zei:"Dit is mijn klas, ik ben de wet en mag alles!"

"Hitler mocht ook alles!"

Toen moest ik benenmaken, die kerel stond op ontploffen. :lol:
laatste aanpassing
Ik moet toegeven dat kwa kennis het Belgisch onderwijs systeem niet slecht is.­ Maar wat heb je aan al die kennis als de nadruk ligt op gehoorzamen, dat wordt er bij ons al vroeg ingestampt.­ Zeker bij de paters.­ Pfff!

Schijt aan autoriteit 4life!

Tenzij ze me net zoals mijn werkgever respectvol behandelen.­
Moeten staat niet meer in mijn woordenboek.­
Uitspraak van Infected Influence op donderdag 28 december 2006 om 15:13:
Een mens leert het beste van zich zelf en bep.­ situaties.­ Iemand vertelde me eens: "­als je een taal wilt leren, ga naar het land in kwestie.".­ Ik heb voornamelijk Engels geleerd door dat ik veel familie in Noorwegen en Engeland heb wonen(TV niet te vergeten).­ Was een kwestie van aanpassing.­

Heb je helemaal gelijk in. Had in mijn eerste 2 maanden hier meer Italiaans geleerd dan dat ik in een heel jaar in NL gedaan had.


Uitspraak van Infected Influence op donderdag 28 december 2006 om 15:13:
Ik had verschillende leraren Frans: De ene ratelde gewoon het boekje af, toen was ik al snel verveeld.­ De andere sprak in het Frans over feestjes, skateboarden, ...­ interessante onderwerpen en toen had ik zoiets:"­ Jeetje snel Frans leren, ik wil weten wat die kerel zegt!"­

Ik had helaas alleen ongeïnspireerde docenten, zoals John Taylor Gatto al in zijn stukje zei 'Boredom is the common condition of schoolteachers, and anyone who has spent time in a teachers' lounge can vouch for the low energy, the whining, the dispirited attitudes, to be found there'
Mijn visie is: Als je passie kan overbrengen voor iets, dan ben je een goede docent. Helaas wordt daar naar mijn mening te weinig aandacht voor vrijgemaakt tegenwoordig, omdat alles efficiënt gericht is.


Uitspraak van Infected Influence op donderdag 28 december 2006 om 15:13:
Zo heb ik eens tegen zo'n leraar gezegt toen hij zei:"­Dit is mijn klas, ik ben de wet en mag alles!"­

Hitler mocht ook alles!"­

:O ghehehe
laatste aanpassing
Uitspraak van Infected Influence op donderdag 21 december 2006 om 18:34:
Damn! Ik hield eigenlijk van vakken zoals geschiedenis

Is wel lagge vak, maar ik leerde daar vorig jaar toch wel over hoe slecht meneer Mahmoud Ahmedinejad is... Maar nooit over dat zijn teksten misschien met opgezet verkeerd vertaald waren.

Met godsdienst leer ik ook hoe slecht moslims wel niet zijn en hoe braaf christenen uit t westen wel niet zijn.

K word soms echt ziek van die gasten die mij dat gaan wijsmaken;)
Uitspraak van BCstefan op vrijdag 29 december 2006 om 22:31:
Is wel lagge vak, maar ik leerde daar vorig jaar toch wel over hoe slecht meneer Mahmoud Ahmedinejad is...­ Maar nooit over dat zijn teksten misschien met opgezet verkeerd vertaald waren.­


Dubbel denken is de truc.
Uitspraak van BCstefan op vrijdag 29 december 2006 om 22:31:
Met godsdienst leer ik ook hoe slecht moslims wel niet zijn en hoe braaf christenen uit t westen wel niet zijn.­

Welke godsdienst? waarvan ze niet eens weten dat ze moloch, aanbidden? brave christenen.....Pff Fuck het vaticaan!

ga quantumfysica, The Law Of Attraction es bestuderen je vindt er meer antwoorden in terug over god dan in elke bijbel....Ze noemen het alleen geen god......
Uitspraak van Infected Influence op donderdag 21 december 2006 om 18:16:
Grappig zo was ik weer eens aan het brainstormen en besefte: hey, het woord "­heelal"­ is eigenlijk het "­al".­ Heel-al

LOL...ik zat van de week aan precies hetzelfde te denken... :lol:

Dat het onderwijssysteem zo in elkaar steekt hoef je mij allang niet meer uit te leggen...
Ik was op zeer jonge leeftijd al bewust van het feit dat het gewoon niet klopte...
Ik liep voor...ik was (nog steeds eigenlijk) leergierig en wilde dus verder...maar ik mocht gewoon niet...
Had er zelf een oplossing voor gevonden...ik ging de anderen gewoon meehelpen zodat we sneller doorkonden naar het volgende onderdeel... Maar dat werd me ook al snel verboden natuurlijk... ;p

Klapperrrrrrrrrr was nog wel dat ze mij naar de Mavo wilden sturen vanwege...komt ie dan he...mijn handschrift was niet netjes genoeg... :roflol:
Mijn ma heeft de directeur van de school keihard uit staan lachen... :lief:
Toendertijd kon ik wel janken en nog niet zo heel lang geleden was ik er nog heel erg kwaad over...nu kan ik er inmiddels wel een beetje om lachen... Tekortkoming aan hun kant...niet bij mij... Ik ben brilliant...punt... B)
Levensbeschouwing vond ik tot een bepaald jaar...toen kregen we een andere leraar...overigens een leuk vak...
Maar dat kwam door de leraar die verhalen uit de bijbel wel op een heel bijzondere manier vertelde...
Het verhaal van Abraham hoe hij het vertelde ben ik nooit meer vergeten...
Abraham sloeg de beeldjes van de goden van zijn vader kapot...
Zijn vader riep...wacht maar mijn goden krijgen je wel!
Ha...dan zou je ze eerst aan elkaar moeten lijmen! :lol:
Uitspraak van TYHARO op zondag 31 december 2006 om 00:54:
LOL...ik zat van de week aan precies hetzelfde te denken... :lol:

Cool! Ik begin te geloven dat het cosmische internet werkt!

Nu nog ff uitvissen wat mijn cosmisch IP adres is. :lol:
laatste aanpassing
Uitspraak van TYHARO op zondag 31 december 2006 om 00:54:
Klapperrrrrrrrrr was nog wel dat ze mij naar de Mavo wilden sturen vanwege...komt ie dan he...mijn handschrift was niet netjes genoeg... :roflol:

Mijn handschrift is net Chinees. Eerder Arabisch eigenlijk.

Ook eens problemen mee gehad. In de basisschool hadden we een vak schoonschrift.
Ik schrijf links en het was verplicht om met vulpen te schrijven. :rot:

1 grote inktvlek. Ikzelf, alles en iedereen in mijn buurt blauw was het resultaat :lol:

Een grote rel op school. Mijn moeder speciaal naar de school directrice om aan haar botte verstand te brengen dat ik al honderden vulpennen had versleten en het gewoon niet ging. Vanaf toen mocht ik met balpen schrijven. Pfff, wat een gedoe altijd! Altijd al speciaal geweest het begon al met linkhandig te zijn :lol:
laatste aanpassing
Uitspraak van Infected Influence op zondag 31 december 2006 om 21:57:
Cool! Ik begin te geloven dat het cosmische internet werkt!

Maak daar maar gewoon het kosmisch bewustzijn of gedeeld bewustzijn van... :p
Maar denk wel dat internet zoiets kan versnellen...hoe meer info je de wereld inpleurt des te sneller de rest van de wereld dat (onbewust) oppikt natuurlijk...

Ik drukte sowieso te hard op mijn vulpen...mijn schrijfschrift waar je idd netjes moest schrijven zag dan ook altijd blauw inclusief mijn hele hand en kleren...waar mijn moeder natuurlijk niet zo blij mee was...
Ik kreeg dan ook nooit stempels en dus ook nooit een sticker die je kreeg als je 10 stempels had...
Bij ons hadden ze trouwens ook vulpennen voor linkshandigen...maar als je te hard knijpt enzo in je vulpen maakt dat natuurlijk ook geen bal uit...

Ik schrijf trouwens met rechts maar mijn manier van een pen vasthouden wijkt compleet af van de manier hoe je hem verplicht moest vasthouden... Je wil niet weten hoe ik mijn pen vasthou... 8)
Officieel moet je de pen met je duim en wijsvinger vasthouden en de overige 3 vingers zitten onder de pen...de pen rust op je middelvinger als het ware... Ik hou mijn pen vast met mijn duim, wijsvinger en middelvinger in een hele rare stand en de andere 2 liggen eronder... :vaag:
laatste aanpassing
Uitspraak van TYHARO op zondag 31 december 2006 om 23:25:
Maak daar maar gewoon het kosmisch bewustzijn of gedeeld bewustzijn van... :p

Bedoelde ik ook. Als het beestje huh... bewustzijn maar een naam heeft :)

Uitspraak van TYHARO op zondag 31 december 2006 om 23:25:
wijkt compleet af van de manier hoe je hem verplicht moest vasthouden...­

Ik wijk al heel mijn leven af! :lol:

Uitspraak van TYHARO op zondag 31 december 2006 om 23:25:
Officieel moet je de pen met je duim en wijsvinger vasthouden en de overige 3 vingers zitten onder de pen...de pen rust op je middelvinger als het ware... Ik hou mijn pen vast met mijn duim, wijsvinger en middelvinger in een hele rare stand en de andere 2 liggen eronder... :vaag:

Als het maar schrijft, toch? :)
Ja...happy new year!
Werd me iets te link buiten met die harde wind...pijlen vlogen om me oren heen... :lol:
Uitspraak van TYHARO op maandag 1 januari 2007 om 00:14:
Ja...happy new year!
Werd me iets te link buiten met die harde wind...pijlen vlogen om me oren heen... :lol:

Yeps dat was het dan weer! en dan te bedenken dat het vroeger een reden was om zwaar te gaan feesten, trippend van feestje naar feestje door de vuurpijlen en strijkers in Antwerpen. Nu zit ik gewoon thuis met een glas wijn en een sigaartje, met Sipje & Sopje(my pet albino rats) op schoot en in mijn nek. Weer een jaar van verstand gemist of erbij.

Op naar 2012!
Doubblethink is hier het motto..­

SCHOOL:
Hoe kunnen we zoveel mogelijk kinderen, zo jong mogelijk volstouwen met gemanipuleerde informatie (linkerhersenhelft) en daarna meteen testen hoeveel er daarna uitkomt.­ Lukt het niet, omdat de rechterhelft protesteert of men gewoon het niet kunt dan wordt iemand "­dom"­ of "­ een moeilijke leerling"­ genoemd.­
Red je universiteitsniveau, betekend het dat je in hun systeem toekomst hebt, je volgt de eisen en protocollen steeds beter en dan hebben ze je nodig om de volgende generatie te infecteren met de gemanipuleerde informatie.­
Vrijheid van meningsuiting is volledig uit zijn verbandf getrokken, het is een kwestie van de andere wel of niet tolereren in gedachten, een zeer kwalijke zaak!
Gelukkig was ik altijd al een moeilijk kind.

Haha, nu komt het nog van pas ook. Het holografisch leven zit toch vol verassingen. :)
Uitspraak van Infected Influence op vrijdag 19 januari 2007 om 13:31:
Gelukkig was ik altijd al een moeilijk kind.­

Hahaha moeilijk of gewoon andere inzichten dan de rest, bij alles vragen stellen en nadenken, zelfs bij je opvoeding..ik ken dat...gnagna
Uitspraak van SuburbanKnight op vrijdag 19 januari 2007 om 13:54:
Hahaha moeilijk of gewoon andere inzichten dan de rest, bij alles vragen stellen en nadenken, zelfs bij je opvoeding..­ik ken dat...­gnagna

Dat hangt af vanuit wie zijn perspectief je het bekijkt.
Eerlijk gezegt deed het me nooit zoveel. Laat de rest maar in de Maas springen, aan de top komen ze nooit. Ze hebben altijd iemand nodig om hun kont te kussen, dat vergeten ze.

Dit was een van mijn eerste spirituele inzichten. Bwahaha...

Ik doe waar ik zin in heb en dat stuit mensen tegen de borst. Ik weet waarom: omdat ze er zelf ook naar verlangen, maar het niet doen uit angst, geld of wat dan ook.

Toen ik individuele begeleiding naar werk, scholing en verslavingsproblematiek deed. Kwam die vent met de geweldige oplossing dat ik druk ben en maar eens voor medicatie moet gaan kijken, NOT!!! Ik moest een heel weekschema gaan opstellen waar ik van uur tot uur precies moet beschrijven wat ik ging doen bv: huishouden, hobby's(tekenen), lezen, soliciteren,...

Ik zei tegen hem:"Creatie kent geen tijd dat is oneindig, daar kan ik geen tekeningetje van maken."

Het gezicht van die man sprak boekdelen! Ik zou me niet gelukkig voelen als alles strak gestruktureerd is.
Ik ben een chaoot tot de dood!
laatste aanpassing
Uitspraak van Infected Influence op vrijdag 19 januari 2007 om 16:07:
Ik zei tegen hem:"­Creatie kent geen tijd dat is oneindig, daar kan ik geen tekeningetje van maken."­

Het gezicht van die man sprak boekdelen! Ik zou me niet gelukkig voelen als alles strak gestruktureerd is.­
Ik ben een chaoot tot de dood!laatste aanpassing 19 januari 2007 16:09

chaotisch in anderen hun ogen mischien.....

Uitspraak van Infected Influence op vrijdag 19 januari 2007 om 16:07:
Dat hangt af vanuit wie zijn perspectief je het bekijkt.­

idd
Uitspraak van SuburbanKnight op vrijdag 19 januari 2007 om 17:19:
chaotisch in anderen hun ogen mischien.....­

Niet helemaal, ik spring van de hak op de tak. Ik ben het kloddertje hier en het kloddertje daar type ook in het gewone leven, maar ik maak er altijd wel iets moois van.

Zelfs (ik heb nog kunstschool gedaan) als ik teken of zeker met speksteen weet ik nooit wat het wordt, ik begin er gewoon aan in ruwe chaotische lijnen. Ik heb nooit geen specifiek doel, dat vormt zich terwijl de steen of houtskool tekening zich vormt. Dat is de kunst!

Maar er zaten ook leerlingen die een hele steriele nette strakke geplande stijl hadden(het omgekeerde van mij) en zo fantastische dingen maakten. Tis maar hoe je bent.

Nu heb een plan en het gaat een hoop werk worden. Om een schaakbord(ook een passie) te maken mischien uit speksteen of ander materiaal met spekstenen stukken. Dit vergt wel wat planning voor het juiste materiaal en de juiste stenen.

Ja, gaaf! Een Illuminati schaakbord met piramides als de torens ofzo.

Let's create! :cheer:
laatste aanpassing